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Monday, December 22, 2008 

Quick, slow, Quick, Quick, slow.

(Not Cap'n) Bob's Interceptor.

It's a fitting tribute to the investigatory skills of our finest anti-terrorism officers that Bob Quick should be so, err, quick in pointing the finger at the Tories for "planting" a story in the Mail on Sunday regarding his wife's car hire business, which he then complained was potentially putting his family at risk, despite the family's home address being advertised on a far from inaccessible website.

This is after all meant to be the man who'll be in charge should there be another terrorist attack, someone with qualities such as remaining calm in a crisis, unflappable, not liable to send in CO19 after another Brazilian wearing a denim jacket. Even if we accept that the Tories have indeed being trying their hardest to gain politically from the utterly foolish raid on Damian Green's office, something which judging by the polls they've failed to do, and have also been putting pressure on the Met to drop the inquiry, the level of paranoia Quick is apparently suffering from to immediately pin the blame on the Conservatives - and not just to do it privately, but to brief the Press Association with your suspicions, accusing the party of acting in a "corrupt way" - shows a fairly shocking lack of judgement for again, someone in his position.

Being in the limelight can obviously do very strange things to you, especially when you have been thrust into it unceremoniously and found yourself at the centre of a furore over breaching the very heart of democracy, as can being concerned for the safety of your family. It does make you wonder whether, as well almost being able to act with something approaching impunity, the police also seem to imagine that they can also say anything, regardless of evidence, and also get away with it. Surely the most ill-advised notion of all on Quick's part was that rather than letting the simmering row over Green's arrest die down over Christmas, as it was always going to, followed by the quiet dropping of the inquiry, he has instead brought all the more attention towards himself and invited the accusations that this just overwhelming proves the closeness of the current crop of senior police officers to the incumbent party of government.

The allegations that Sir Ian Blair presided over a politically correct police force were always ridiculous - chance would be a fine thing - but far more dangerous is the idea that Labour and the police are in cahoots, one not helped by the disgraceful initial lobbying by the police for 90 and then 42 days, which only succeeded in turning ever more of those who might have been sympathetic against it. In reality both the Conservatives and Labour have increasingly kow-towed to police demands for new powers or laws, mainly because they turned the prevention of crime into a battle over who could be the toughest. Having failed to provide total job or economic security, governments have instead turned to the idea that they can provide total personal security as a failsafe, when they can of course do neither. Labour's authoritarianism, especially under Brown and Smith, although how quickly we forget past home secretaries and their own excesses, has been more noticeable because Brown cannot defend it as well as Blair could or simply doesn't have the inclination to, and because Smith, like John Reid, actually seems to relish playing the hard (wo)man, an ultra-Blairite thug when being a Blairite has become deeply unfashionable. Combined with her apparent inability to suffer shame when she blames Boris Johnson of all people for politicising the police, you can hardly blame those who have taken to calling her "Jackboots Jacqui". Thing is, if she knew she'd probably wouldn't mind in the slightest.

Similarly, it would be nice to think that Labour's decision to step back from direct elections to police authorities was because it had realised that was unlikely to increase accountability and instead only increase the politicisation of the police - instead it's hard not to imagine it was because they knew it was hardly likely any of their representatives would be the ones to win the popular vote. All sides, Labour, Conservative and the police need to find a way to retreat from their current positions and realise that this is doing none of them any good, but doing that after all consider themselves to be unfairly slurred is easier said than done.

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I'm slightly alarmed by the third link you use and their obsession with quotes from Obama about the military, when anyone who read his last book would know he believes in a strong military, rather than some sense he's been outed.

Anywho...

Daniel Hoffman Gill is evidently not a regular reader of Lord Patel. The masthead quotes do vary - as and when the vast layout staff can shift their arses to change them.

There is no obsession with Obama. However there are many , who unlike DHG have not read Obama's lightweight read nor are regular readers of the Journal of Foreign Relations.

For example over 2 years ago he could have enjoyed ..

"Where once more-marginal applicants would simply have been denied credit, lenders are now able to quite efficiently judge the risk posed by individual applicants and to price that risk appropriately. These improvements have led to rapid growth in subprime mortgage lending; indeed, today subprime mortgages account for roughly 10 percent of the number of all mortgages outstanding, up from just 1 or 2 percent in the early 1990s......

.......we must conclude that innovation and structural change in the financial services industry have been critical in providing expanded access to credit for the vast majority of consumers, including those of limited means.This fact underscores the importance of our roles as policymakers, researchers, bankers, and consumer advocates in fostering constructive innovation that is both responsive to market demand and beneficial to consumers. "

Alan Greenspan
Federal Reserve System’s Fourth Annual Community Affairs Research Conference, Washington, D.C. April 8, 2005


If they have a theme they merely attempt to provide an identity of straws in the wind ... and have acheived modest success.

Obama has been sold on a false Bill of Sale ... which those who have not followed his remarkable rise without trace will find out as the next 4 years unwind.

The Editorial team are currently juggling with this one.. "Things that can't happen, are about to"

What do you think DHG ?

Jacqui's theme song is evidently

"These boots are made for walkin',
And that's what they're gonna do.
One of these days these boots
Are gonna walk all over you."

I'm not a regular reader of Lord Patel, as was clear from my comment, as I followed Septicisle's link.

I'm very glad the quotes do change.

My problem with them was that it smacked of an agenda on Obama, the wolf in sheeps clothing agenda that I've grown tired of reading about and that the volume of them was there to push a point I thought anyone worth their salt would be aware of.

Obviously not.

As for lightweight read, I think you're confusing lightweight with readable and the book clearly carries a disclaimer regarding the depth he can go into regarding policy matters in that particular tome.

I'm glad straws in the wind have identitys, does that also stretch to the piss in the wind?

As for false bill of sale, I don't buy that but I do buy that now Darth Vader is on the way out, there is an air of desperation as to what to attack next, as if there is no content without it.

I think the editorial team should go for:

"It's so easy to laugh, it's so easy to hate, it's takes guts to be gentle and kind."

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